Sprouting for Better Nutrition and Health

You’ve heard of Alfalfa sprouts and Brussels Sprouts, but there are dozens of other sprouts you can eat for better health. Edible sprouts offer more nutrition than fully-grown plants, and have gained popularity as an ingredient in salads, sandwiches and main dishes since the 1970s.

When a germinated seed starts to grow, a vegetable turns into a sprout. Only some sprouts are edible. You can buy sprouts at a health food store or farmer’s market, or grow your own sprouts. When you sprout seeds at home, you can control the growing environment and make sure the sprouts are nutritious and free of contaminants.

Sprouts 101

Many plant-based foods begin as sprouts. After a seed cracks open and a root or stalk grows out of the soil. These fledging veggies and grains have higher concentrations of nutrients than full-grown plants.

When seeds are exposed to moisture and the right temperature, they turn into young plants. You’ll find grain, leafy and bean sprouts as an ingredient in salads and vegetarian cuisine. Sprouts were prescribed by Ancient Chinese medics to cure many diseases. In the 1700s, sailors ate Vitamin C-rich lemons, limes and sprouts to prevent scurvy.

During World War II, a Nutrition Professor at Cornell University, Dr. Clive M. McCay wrote an article about the virtues of soybean sprouts.  His studies showed that sprouts contained almost as much Vitamin C as citrus fruits and large amounts of B-complex vitamins and Vitamin A. Sprouts are also easier to digest because starches turn into simple sugars during the sprouting process.

Sprout Recipes

Curry isn’t just for dishes at your favorite Indian restaurant. You can make fenugreek curry with fenugreek sprouts. Fenugreek offers many health benefits, including better digestion, lower cholesterol and less inflammation. It also boosts men’s libido and increases breast milk production in nursing mothers.

Chinese Mung Bean Sprout Stir-Fry is easy to make, with only three ingredients (bean sprouts, garlic and onions). The sprouts are high in folic acid, B vitamins, Vitamin C and protein. You can also mix in shrimp or beef with the recipes if you’re not a vegetarian.

Use home-grown chick pea sprouts to make your own Sprouted Hummus Spread. A healthy alternative to sour-cream based dips, hummus also includes garlic, cayenne pepper and sesame paste to prevent high blood pressure and fight inflammation.

The Nutritional Value of Sprouts

Sprouts contain up to 100 times more enzymes than raw fruits and vegetables. When your food has more amino acids, vitamins, minerals and fatty acids, you’ll feel and look healthier.  All your body processes, from digestion to circulation, will improve.

The sprouting process brings more essential fatty acids into the bean, vegetable or grain. Two essential fatty acids,  linoleic and alpha-linolenic, are found in sprouts. Linoleic and alpha-linolenic fatty acids help build the essential fatty acids Omega 6 and Omega 3. EFAs help your body with hormone production,  blood pressure regulation, blood clotting and several other vital functions.

All sprouts are alkaline, balancing acidity in your body’s pH and reducing the chance of cancer, diabetes and heart disease. Sprouts contain more antioxidants, essential amino acids, vitamins and minerals during this youthful stage than as mature plants. The high concentration of nutrients in sprouts  may be due to their truncated size.

The estrogens in sprouts also provide the following benefits:

  • Increases bone density
  • Controls hot flashes
  • Reduces PMS symptoms
  • Prevents osteoporosis
  • Controls menopause symptoms

Every type of sprout has specific antioxidants and other nutrients.

Alfalfa sprouts

Alfalfa sprouts contain an amino acid called canavanine. This amino acid has been shown to reduce the spread of colon and pancreatic cancer. One study showed alfalfa sprouts lowers blood glucose levels to reduce the chance of diabetes. They also fight cholesterol by reducing the amount of lipids in the blood.

Broccoli Sprouts

When you eat broccoli sprouts, you’re consuming the root, stem and head. The root, leaves and stems have highly nutritious glucosinolates. Distributors of full-grown broccoli cut off leaves and roots, and offer you fewer nutrients than home-grown sprouts. The younger a broccoli plant, the more glucosinolates it contains. The phytochemicals in broccoli sprouts may also help curb obesity by boosting energy and making you burn fat more rapidly.

Broccoli sprouts have 50 times more sulfurophane as regular broccoli, and regular broccoli is considered to be one of the most nutritious vegetables you can eat, along with kale and spinach. Sulforaphane, an antioxidant  that stimulates natural detoxifying enzymes, has been shown to reduce the risk of prostrate, bladder and breast cancer.

Mung Bean Sprouts

Mung beans belong to the same legume family as peas and lentils. They contain protein and dietary fiber, which help fill you up so you’ll eat less. With B vitamins, magnesium, zinc, copper and potassium, you’ll get a lot of nutrition in a small package.  A one cup serving of mung beans has 13.7 milligrams of Vitamin C to protect immunity, and 43% of the daily value of Vitamin K, which is necessary for blood clotting.

Radish Sprouts

Used raw in salads and sushi or as a garnish, radish sprouts may be purple and white with a bit of light green. A 100 gram serving of these spicy, crunchy sprouts offers 48% of the daily value of Vitamin C.  If you’re trying to lose weight, Vitamin C will help your body turn fat into fuel by producing a substance called carnitine. Radish sprouts have an impressive amount of B Vitamins, including  24% of the daily value of folate, and 14% of Vitamin B6 and Vitamin B3 (Niacin).

Sprouting at Home

Eating healthy can be expensive. Buying fruits, vegetables, specialty products and grains at farmer’s markets and Whole Foods can take a sizable bite out of your food budget. Sprouting at home provides tasty, nutritious veggies and grains at a fraction of the cost.

Make your own sprouts at home using a sanitized, wide mouth jar. You’ll need cheesecloth and mesh and rubber band to secure it to the top of the jar. And, of course, seeds or beans.

Wash beans or seeds. Place the jar in a clean quiet area, away from cooking grease, pets and dirt.

Put two tablespoons of seeds into the jar and add a few inches of cool water. Cover the top of the mason jar with cheesecloth and tie it around the top with a rubber band. Let the seeds soak overnight; then drain the water. Leave seeds in the jar the next few days. Fill the jar with water and swish the seeds around to drain them in the morning and evening. Keep the jar in a spot away from direct sunlight or the next few days.

You’ll notice white shoots growing from the seeds in two or three days. By the fifth day, you’ll see a tangle of sprouts. Fully-grown sprouts will have green tips. (You may notice some unsprouted seeds in the jar. This means you probably used too many seeds. ) Rinse off the sprouts and use in salads, sandwiches or recipes.

You can use the steps above to sprout most seeds, including:

  • Mung Bean
  • Mustard
  • Broccoli
  • Oat
  • Beet
  • Sunflower
  • Soybean
  • Radish
  • Lentil

Buy seeds specifically designed for sprouting. They’ll be labeled as chemical, GMO and pathogen-free. Popular online seed stores include Burpee and the Sprouthouse. Cheap, commercial seeds and sprouts have caused salmonella and E.coli outbreaks. You’ll also need to keep trays, containers and domes disinfected to avoid contamination. (http://anrcatalog.ucanr.edu/pdf/8151.pdf)

Buying Sprouts from the Store

You can buy sprouts from your local health food store if you don’t have time to sprout at home.

Outbreaks of salmonella were reported in 2009 due to contaminated sprouts. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, if you must buy sprouts instead of sprouting at home, follow these guidelines:

  • Buy only refrigerated sprouts
  • Store sprouts in a clean refrigerator at 40 degrees or less
  • Rinse sprouts under running water before eating
  • Cooking store-bought sprouts reduces the chance of food poisoning
  • Avoid buying sprouts that look slimy or withered

Children, pregnant women, the elderly and anyone with a weak immune system shouldn’t eat store-bought sprouts or order restaurant dishes made with raw sprouts.

The Special Benefits of Sprouting Wheatgrass

Wheatgrass has a reputation as one of the most nutritious superfoods you can consume. It contains vitamins, hundreds of enzymes, 18 amino acids, protein, calcium, iron, copper, manganese and selenium.

Wheatgrass breaks down carbohydrates into glucose to give you more energy. It improves your digestive system to keep you regular, and oxygenates your blood. Wheatgrass aids cell growth and division to help you stay strong and prevent anemia. It strengthens your hair, skin, eyes and liver.

Four grams of wheatgrass contain:

  • Vitamin E – 1600% of the daily value
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1) – 733% of the daily value
  • Niacin  (Vitamin B3) – 1260% of the daily value
  • Vitamin B6 –  1950% of the daily value
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) – 15,294% of the daily value
  • Manganese   –   7,000% of the daily value
  • Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) – 360% of the daily value

You can make wheatgrass juice from sprouts you grow at home, or take wheatgrass supplements from a verified supplement manufacturer.

Harvesting fresh wheatgrass at home offers many advantages over buying wheatgrass juice at a restaurant or store. The wheatgrass juice you buy at a retail juice chain may be contaminated if the juicing machine isn’t cleaned properly on a regular basis. Even bottled wheatgrass juice from the health food store may contain E.coli or other harmful bacteria due to lax production standards or use of inferior quality wheatgrass.

It’s easy to sprout wheatgrass indoors using growing trays.

  1. Soak winter wheatberries (they’re actually seeds, not berries) in water 8 to 12 hours. (You can also use hard spring wheat, though it’s not as effective.)
  2. Drain the water through the cheesecloth on top of the jar or use a strainer. Rinse the seeds before planting.
  3. Sprout the seeds for 16 to 24 hours. After the seeds develop tails, plant them in potting soil.
  4. Use organic soil in the trays or planting container. Place seeds in the soil separately, with an even amount of space between them. Don’t bury the seeds under the soil. Sprinkle seeds with water from a spray bottle. Cover the tray or container with newspaper to keep out the light.
  5. Let the wheatgrass grow for two to three days. Keep them in a dark, humid area and check every so often to see if they’re sprouting. Water the shoots twice a day to keep them moist.
  6. When the wheatgrass grows to one inch in height, place it near a window, in indirect sunlight. Water daily, but don’t soak the soil.
  7. You can harvest fully-grown wheatgrass in 9 to 10 days, when it reaches 8 to 10 inches in height.  Cut stems at the bottom, one at a time, with a scissors.

Tips for Preventing Mold When Sprouting Wheatgrass

  • Prevent mold by soaking sees 10 to 12 hours instead of 8 to 10. The seeds will expand more, allowing for better germination and quicker sprouting.
  • Increase air circulation with an air conditioner or fan to keep the temperature at between 60 and 80 degrees.
  • Cover the tray with a damp newspaper to keep sunlight out and keep the soil moist. Use a spray bottle of water to wet the paper, but don’t soak it. Keep water from getting directly on the soil or sprouting seeds.
  • When sprouts take root, put a tray without holes under the main tray as a reservoir. This second tray eliminates the need for you to water from the top.

REVV from WheatgrassLove gives you another way to harness the power of wheatgrass in your daily life. Chocolate mint REVV wafers give you all the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants of wheatgrass without the mess caused by juicing – or concerns about harmful bacteria. REVV also contains caffeine and cocoa, for more energy and L-Taurine to reduce cholesterol and improve cognition. Take REVV with you wherever you go when you want a healthy pick-me-up. Read more about REVV here.

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Pay Now or Pay Later: Healthy Habits for a Better Life

Living in the present, not the future or the past, is one of the key elements of making the most of your time. When it comes to your health, though, you may have to make certain sacrifices right now to ensure you remain fit and vibrant well into old age. These sacrifices will help you look and feel better today as well as in the future.

A 2009 study in the British Medical Journal showed that four habits separated long-living Brits from those with lower life expectancy:

  • Being active for 30 minutes a day
  • Eating more fruits and vegetables
  • Avoiding excess alcohol
  • Not smoking

Here are ten tips for living a better life now and live longer and healthier way into your retirement years.

1. Eat a sensible diet, but don’t be too strict

You don’t need to be overly careful about what you eat. Being too strict about food can be as detrimental to your health as eating too much junk food. There are drawbacks to being an extreme vegan, including lack of Vitamin B12 in the diet. Being a smart vegetarian is good for you, but you may need to take supplements to ensure you get enough iron, zinc or B12.

Good eating is sensible eating. It means eliminating certain foods and restricting others. Plan your meals, and keep fresh fruits and vegetables in your fridge. Snack on air-popped popcorn instead of processed snacks. You don’t need to become a vegan or vegetarian to be healthy. Avoid hot dogs and other packaged meats. Choose lean, organic meats and fresh-caught fish, and restrict meat-based meals to two or three times a week.

Binging, eating a strict vegan diet and limiting calories indefinitely are often as bad as eating junk food. These habits sap your body of nutrition, brain power energy.  Replacing junk food and mindless snacking with nutritious meals.

2. Drink more water

Most people don’t drink enough water. Sure, there’s water in the coffee, beer and soda you drink, but the dehydrating effects of those beverages do more harm than good. Drink filtered tap water or bottled water to flush out toxins in your body and naturally suppress your appetite.

Drinking a glass of water before a meal helps fill you up so you won’t eat as much. It aids digestion, keeping your intestines and stomach lubricated so you stay regular.

When you’re tired, or have to spend all night studying or working on a project, drink water instead of coffee or energy drinks. Water boosts your energy level and focus without causing potential damage to your heart like caffeine.

Drinking diet soda won’t help you lose weight. A 2015 study showed that long-term diet soda intake caused an increase in study subjects’ abdominal fat over a nine-year period.

To stay thinner and healthier, drink water, herbal tea and a moderate amount of milk and juice instead of diet soda.

3. Create a Healthy Foods List

Don’t “wing it” at the grocery store. Create a master list of healthy foods that you like and choose from it every time you go shopping. The list should include some of the following items.

Spices do more than add flavor to recipes. Turmeric, cayenne pepper, garlic and rosemary offer antioxidants to prevent inflammation, colds, high blood pressure and even cancer.

  • Rosemary-improves digestion, memory and blood circulation
  • Turmeric (curcumin) – strong anti-inflammatory, high in antioxidants, lowers risk of heart disease, cancer and brain diseases
  • Cayenne Pepper – natural appetite suppressant, boosts metabolism, relieves joint and migraine pain
  • Garlic – lowers blood pressure and cholesterol, may prevent Alzheimer’s and dementia
  • Cinnamon – has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, reduces risk of heart disease, lowers blood sugar

Broccoli is one of the most nutritious vegetables.  It contains:

Vitamin K (for better blood clotting and bone health)

Folate (decreases breast cancer risk for women)

Vitamin C (helps form collagen for better-looking skin)

Fiber (to aid digestion and suppress appetite)

Steam broccoli and drizzle with olive oil or, lemon juice. Add chopped garlic or black pepper for flavor. Broccoli scores high on the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index (ANDI), along with spinach, carrots, strawberries, blueberries and the first place winner, kale.

Grapefruit may reduce the risk of kidney stones and cholesterol, lowers blood pressure and promotes healthy digestion. It contains 59% of the daily value of Vitamin C. Pink and red grapefruit have the carotenoid phytonutrient, Lycopene, which has been shown to reduce the chance of prostate cancer in men.

Other Healthy Foods

Salmon- Authority Nutrition lists salmon as the world’s most nutrient-dense food. All fatty cold water fish contain Omega 3 fatty acids, but a 4 ounce serving of salmon contains 55% of the daily value of Omega 3 fatty acid. Salmon contains mostly  EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), but also has some  DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) fatty acids. Omega 3’s are known to reduce the risk of heart disease, improve mood and cognitive function, and strengthen eyesight and joints.

Salmon also has amino acids and a large percentage of the daily value of Vitamin D, Vitamin B12, selenium and Vitamins B3 and B6.

Nuts – Snacking on pecans and other unsalted, uncoated tree nuts is more than a substitute for high-fat chips and candy. Tree nuts are high in healthy monounsaturated healthy fats. They lower your LDL cholesterol and improve the lining of your arteries. Nuts contain fiber, Vitamin E, Omega 3 fatty acids, and the amino acid L-arginine. They are high in calories (157 calories in one ounce of cashews), so be careful not to overindulge.

Other foods that should make your list include avocados, tomatoes, Swiss chard, bananas, eggs, lean beef, sardines, turkey, bell peppers, cucumbers, oatmeal, groats (unhulled oats) legumes, sweet potatoes and dark chocolate.

4. Cut Down on Sugar and Sugar Substitutes

Sugar makes your food taste sweeter, but it doesn’t offer any nutritional benefits. Cane sugar, GMO beet sugar and high fructose corn syrup contain empty calories. They don’t have any vitamins, minerals, fats or proteins. Sugar does make you more energetic temporarily (a “sugar rush”), but causes you to crash and become fatigued a short time later.

Artificial sweeteners don’t offer anything positive either, and may be just as bad for your long-term health. Saccharin, Neotame ,Acesulfame, Aspartame, and Sucralose have all been cleared for use by, and considered safe, by the FDA.  Artificial sweeteners may be calorie-free, but you’ll pay in other ways. Studies indicate long-term use of artificial sweeteners put you at a greater risk of getting type 2 diabetes or heart-damaging metabolic syndrome.

You’ll get used to the intense sweetness of Splenda or other sweeteners after using it for awhile, and the natural sweetness of fruit or real sugar won’t appeal to you anymore. This may cause you to eat fewer nutritious fruits because they won’t taste as sweet to you. Using low to no-calorie sweeteners have also been shown to increase weight gain instead of prevent it.

Replace artificial sweeteners with real sugar and learn to use natural sugar sparingly in beverages. Try to develop a taste for drinking coffee or tea without added sugar. Eating too much sugar may lead to weight gain, diabetes, and will harm your teeth. A teaspoon of sugar has 16 calories, and a teaspoon of honey contains 22 calories, but you won’t need too much to sweeten drinks. One or two teaspoons should be enough.

5. Get Active

Exercising at the gym gets boring and repetitive after awhile, so try walking, jogging or cycling outdoors and get some fresh air at the same time.

Don’t have a lot of time to exercise? Do interval training on a stationary bike for ten minutes (warm up, cycle fast, then cycle slowly), or engage in any form of exercise in ten-minute bursts. You’ll reap the benefits of exercise without spending a lot of time or money at the gym.

Regular exercise (the American Heart Association recommends 2 ½ hours per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise) helps you live a longer, healthier life. Studies show active people live longer. Doing the recommended amount of exercise decreases the likelihood of death during a 14-year period by 31% and even getting some exercise decreases the chance of death during the same period by 20%.

6. Reduce Stress

Inflammation caused by ongoing stress can contribute to heart disease, cancer and other chronic health problems. A Carnegie-Mellon study showed that prolonged psychological stress makes people more prone to inflammation, as well as the common cold and other viruses.

It’s unrealistic to assume you can eliminate all stress from your life, but you can reduce some of it and learn how to control the rest. Limit your exposure to toxic people and situations. When that’s not possible, change the way you react to stress.

Exercise, meditation, deep breathing and listening to your favorite music regularly will help you stay calm and positive. The calmer you are, the less reactive you’ll be in stressful situations. Stay centered to deal with stress and avoid making bad decisions because you’re upset.

7. Sleep 7-9 Hours a Night

Many busy entrepreneurs or executives pride themselves on working all night and getting only a few hours sleep.

Long-term lack of sleep can cause moodiness, depression and a weakened immune system. If the self-imposed insomnia continues, it leads to chronic and possibly deadly health problems, including heart disease and diabetes.

To improve your chances of getting enough restful sleep each night, turn off your Smartphone, computer and other electronics an hour before going to bed.  You can also optimize the quality and quantity of your sleep by doing the following:

  • Regulate your body clock by going to bed and waking up at the same time every day.
  • Get more sunlight during the day, especially in the morning, and let lots of natural light into your home during the day.
  • Use heavy curtains or shades to keep your room completely dark at night.
  • Limit caffeine and alcohol intake two or three hours before going to bed.
  • Exercise regularly during the day. Even walking and doing yoga for 10-20 minutes a day will help you fall asleep sooner and improve sleep quality.

8. Find a Fulfilling Hobby

All work and no play make you a dull boy (or girl). Spend your free time drawing, painting, writing, playing piano or participating in sports. Exercise your body and/or your creativity to reduce stress, relieve boredom, and work off excess energy.

Hobbies offer a great way to forge new friendships and social connections. They also help structure your non-work hours, so you don’t end up snacking in front of the TV all weekend. Hobbies make you more interesting by giving you new skills that may even lead to paid work –or a popular YouTube channel.

9. Help Others

Take the focus off yourself by volunteering with the Red Cross or another local organization. Writing a check to your favorite charity is fine, but it only gives you a fleeting sense of helping others. Check out Volunteermatch.com to search for organizations in many fields that need your expertise.

You can learn new skills and establish new social connections through volunteering (just like you can through a hobby), plus you get the added satisfaction of helping other people, animals, or improving the environment.

Volunteering is good for all age groups, but a University of Minnesota study shows it’s particularly helpful for the continued mental and physical health of retirees and older adults.

10. Practice Gratitude

Exhibiting gratitude helps you develop new personal and business relationships. When you thank people for their advice or help, they’ll remember you and be more likely to contact you in the future.  Being appreciative offers the following advantages:

  • Improves friendships

Gratitude enables you to listen closely to your friends’ concerns, strengthening relationships.

  • Increases self-esteem

Being thankful to teachers, co-workers and mentors (or anyone who helps you) has been shown to boost self-esteem.

  • Boosts physical and psychological health

You’ll be less apt to experience regret, jealousy, frustration and other negative

emotions if you’re grateful for what you have. You’ll be calmer and happier and more likely to take care of your physical health, which leads to a longer life.

Practice healthy habits when you’re young to avoid or reduce many of the pitfalls of getting older. Gaining a lot of weight, becoming frail or developing diabetes or heart disease aren’t a given for older adults who practiced good habits when they were younger.

Take care of yourself (regardless of your age). Taking vitamins and natural supplements should be part of your routine, too. When you need energy, take chocolate mint flavored REVV Instant Energy Wafers instead of drinking coffee or eating sugary foods. REVV contains wheatgrass, one of nature’s superfoods, as well as choline,  L-Taurine, Periwinkle Herb and B-Complex vitamins. Order REVV here.

10 Ways to Eat Smaller Portions for Health and Weight Loss

Eating big meals full of meat with gravy, lots of pasta and second helpings of dessert can pack on the pounds and affect your overall health. When you save all your calories for one or two big meals a day, you’re more likely to overeat since it’s been several hours since your last meal.

Going up to five hours between meals usually won’t cause hunger pangs for most people. If you like to eat a late dinner, you might be setting yourself for overeatingand your metabolism will slow down.

When your body has to process a large amount of food at once, it can cause your digestive system to become sluggish. You don’t have to forego big meals for good. A big meal with all the trimmings is fine once in awhile, but don’t make it an everyday habit.

Be aware of not only what you eat, but how much of it you eat. The portions of mashed potatoes and gravy you eat at dinner and the slices of pie you eat for dessert can add pounds to your frame before you know it. Here are ten ways you can eat smaller portions during meals and snacks to maintain a healthy weight.

Limit Portion Size

Choose to eat a healthy portion of any food, and you won’t gain weight or suffer any ill effects to your health.

It’s not what you eat, but how much of it that causes problems. If you eat three Girl Scout cookies with a glass of milk, you won’t gain weight. If eat a whole box and wash it down with soda, your waistline (and your teeth) will suffer.      

We know a whole box of cookies can total 2000 calories or more; a few cookies are only about 200. You can’t stay fit and healthy if you splurge on cookies and chips regularly. When you feel like snacking in front of the TV, try eating air-popped popcorn seasoned with cayenne pepper or whole-grain crackers. Even if you absentmindedly eat too much, you won’t gain as much weight as if you’d binged on cookies.

Portion control, however, applies to all foods – even the healthy ones. Learn to plan food portions when you cook, and be aware of how much you eat at restaurants.

Drink More Water and Herbal Tea

Drink more water before meals and between meals to fill up your stomach. You’ll eat less and be well-hydrated. Along with herbal tea, water prevents hunger pangs without the harmful effects (and calories) of soda, coffee drinks and energy drinks.

Here are a few low to no-calorie herbal teas to keep you full between meals :

  • Green
  • Oolong
  • Goji
  • Chamomile
  • Ginger

Be careful when choosing herbal teas. Some teas, like green and oolong, contain caffeine and can cause you to become jumpy if you drink too much of it

Share Restaurant Meals with a Friend or Bring Home a “Doggie Bag”

According this article, 92% of American restaurants serve large portions, resulting in meals that often contain more calories than the recommended daily calorie requirement for an entire day.

Share an order with a friend, or eat half of an entrée at the restaurant and save the rest for later. Instead of ordering an entrée, order a salad or an appetizer. You can even order a children’s meal. Unless you have strong willpower, avoid the buffet.

Most servers will be happy to accommodate special requests, such as putting salad dressing or gravy in a cup on the side. (Putting salad dressing and condiments on the side prevents you from slathering too much on your food.)

Don’t be afraid to ask for a doggie bag for leftovers. Boxing or bagging leftovers makes sense. Restaurant meals, even at causal sit-down chains, are somewhat expensive, especially if you bring the whole family.

Use a Smaller Plate

We’ve been taught to eat everything on our plates since we were kids. It’s natural to feel guilty if we’re in a restaurant or at a dinner party and we fail to eat all the food in front of us. Learn to use smaller plates. With a larger plate you’ll apt to fill it up even if you know you shouldn’t.

Don’t Use Electronics While You Eat

Eat slowly instead of gulping down your meal. You’ll actually enjoy the taste and texture of your food, and you’ll eat less.

Instead of eating in front of the computer, use your dinner table. Family dinners have been shown to foster better relationships between spouses, as well as parents and children. A home-cooked meal, even one made by a beginning cook, is better for you than gulping down fast food in your car or at your desk.

Tip – Don’t lie down after eating as it will tamper with digestive process and may cause acid reflux, especially if you’ve eaten

Eat Smaller Meals throughout the Day

Studies differ on the advantages of eating smaller meals throughout the day, but the longer you wait between meals, the likelier you are to eat more when you do finally eat. Your body burns energy every time you eat to digest food. When you eat small meals several times a day, it boosts your metabolism and you burn more calories.

Eat oatmeal with blueberries for breakfast instead of bacon, eggs and pancakes. For extra fiber and nutrition, substitute groats for oatmeal. Groats are the whole, unprocessed form of oats. They take longer to cook, but are much more filling than rolled or steel-cut oats.  Follow your breakfast of oatmeal or groats with an apple mid-morning, and eat a tuna sandwich at lunch time. Instead of a sugary coffee specialty drink in the afternoon, drink a sugar-free banana smoothie.  This eating schedule may seem odd at first, like you’re denying yourself food, but all you’re doing is spreading your food intake throughout the day instead of cramming it into two or three meals.

Need more variety in a small-portion diet? Try this delicious 382- calorie Honey Roasted Carrot, Coriander and Ginger Soup with Crunchy Chickpea Croutons soup for lunch or a late afternoon pick-me-up.  Here’s a list of portion-controlled, low-calorie recipes to prevent overeating caused by super-sized food servings.  

Tip- Your body may take up to 20 minutes before you realize you’re full. Slow down your eating by taking smaller bites and thoroughly chewing your food before swallowing. Make sure your mouth is empty before taking another bite of food.  

Get between Seven and Nine Hours of Sleep Each Night

When you’re tired, you tend to crave more carbohydrates and overeat.( Fatigue’s been shown to stimulate production of Ghrelin, a hunger-inducing hormone.) After you eat cake, doughnuts or other processed carbs, you’ll feel energetic for awhile, but it’ll soon fade. Getting enough sleep provides you with more natural focus and energy to get through your day and perform tasks, and it curbs your appetite too.

Choose Whole, Unprocessed Foods

When you replace processed foods with fresh foods, and eat smaller meals several times each day, you’ll lose weight or, at the very least, maintain your current weight. And you’ll feel “lighter” and healthier instead of feeling “stuffed” after each meal.

Eat a salad, low-fat chicken soup or veggies as an appetizer. The fiber helps control your appetite and fills you up fast. Veggies, salad and other fiber-heavy foods travel more slowly through your digestive system. Broccoli, spinach and tomatoes are just a few vegetables that’ll fill you up and add valuable nutrients to your diet. Broccoli is high in Vitamin K, Vitamin C, iron and potassium. It also contains many plant compounds that contribute to better health, including sulforaphane, which protects against many different types of cancer.    

study in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that eating potato chips or French fries regularly leads to a bigger weight gain than noshing on other comfort foods.

If you can’t summon the willpower to stop eating chips and cookies,  then keep your house free of sugary and salty treats until you can exercise self control. Replace high-calorie snacks with fresh fruits.

Diets high in red meat, alcohol, sugary drinks and processed flour also lead to an arthritic condition called gout. Avoid gout by eating more eggs, whole grains, Vitamin C, low-fat dairy products and drinking more water. Also avoid certain food combinations when planning meals. Eating bacon and eggs, or any two concentrated protein sources in a single meal will impede digestion and cause fatigue.

Measure Your Food When Cooking at Home

At home, don’t guesstimate how much salt, flour or butter you’ll need for a recipe – at least until you until become skilled at it. Buy an accurate scale, measuring cups and measuring spoons if you don’t have them already.

When you cook at home, include protein (beans, lean red meat, etc.) and low glycemic index carbohydrates (whole grains, pasta) with every meal. When figuring portions, a half cup of oatmeal or pasta is referred to as a single serving.  Two cups of raw spinach equals one serving; half a cup is the best serving size for cooked or canned veggies.

Serve food from the stove or a separate serving station. If you eat from serving platters at the table, it’ll be easier to lose track of how often you help yourself to more food. You’ll be more aware of going for your third or fourth helping if you have to get up and walk to the stove or counter to get food.

It may seem a little old-fashioned to schedule meals at exact times, but it does help you focus only on eating and prevent you from multi-tasking when you should be enjoying your food. You shouldn’t do anything but eat while you’re at the table – unless, of course you have an interesting tablemate. Talking with a friend or family member may actually make you eat less, while other distractions make you eat more.

You’ll be better able to keep track of how much you eat when you schedule regular meals. When meals are scheduled and just a few hours apart, you’ll be better able to control cravings for junk food and quick trips to the Starbucks.

Distract Yourself When You’re Tempted to Overeat

Although drinking coffee at Starbucks costs more than brewing it at home, many people buy their lattes from coffee shops because of the social outlet it gives them. You don’t need to give up the social aspect of going to Starbucks or another local coffee shop – just order plain coffee instead of sugary coffee drinks with whipped cream on top.

If you eat when you’re bored or upset, try doing something else to pass the time and forgot about food. Take a walk, visit a friend or do yoga. You’ll soon be immersed in your new activity and lose the desire to snack.

Eat a cup of low-calorie vegetables before a meal as an appetizer, or add vegetables to casseroles and sandwiches. Adding a low-calorie vegetable to a meal supplies nutrients, and its high water content fills you up to prevent overeating.  

Portions and Digestive Health

Your digestive system consists of your mouth, esophagus, stomach, intestines, liver pancreas and rectum. That’s a lot of body parts for a seven-course meal to work its way through three times a day, everyday. Large meals of processed foods keep you “backed up”.   If you eat three heavy meals daily, your body has to work extra hard to process all that food. It’s much better to eat smaller, more frequent meals. If you must eat larger meals, choose lighter foods – fish, organically-raised poultry, vegetables and whole grains – instead of the usual meat and potatoes.  

The most common digestive problems related to overeating and bad food combinations include upset stomach, nausea, bloating, acid reflux and constipation.

Watching your food portions during meals – and when you’re snacking – helps you stay fit and energetic. It may take awhile to get used to eating smaller portions and saving the rest for later, but once you find out how much better you feel when you eat light, you won’t go back to “stuffing” yourself at dinner.

For extra energy in between meals, take a REVV Instant Energy WaferREVV is made with the superfood wheatgrass, along with periwinkle herb, choline, L-taurine and tasty, healthy cocoa. REVV’s a safe, natural supplement that gives you vigor without the sugar and calories of energy drinks.  

 

 

10 Ways to Eat Smaller Portions for Health and Weight Loss

Eating big meals full of meat with gravy, lots of pasta and second helpings of dessert can pack on the pounds and affect your overall health. When you save all your calories for one or two big meals a day, you’re more likely to overeat since it’s been several hours since your last meal.

Going up to five hours between meals usually won’t cause hunger pangs for most people. If you like to eat a late dinner, you might be setting yourself for overeating, and your metabolism will slow down.

When your body has to process a large amount of food at once, it can cause your digestive system to become sluggish. You don’t have to forego big meals for good. A big meal with all the trimmings is fine once in awhile, but don’t make it an everyday habit.

Be aware of not only what you eat, but how much of it you eat. The portions of mashed potatoes and gravy you eat at dinner and the slices of pie you eat for dessert can add pounds to your frame before you know it. Here are ten ways you can eat smaller portions during meals and snacks to maintain a healthy weight.

Limit Portion Size

Choose to eat a healthy portion of any food, and you won’t gain weight or suffer any ill effects to your health.

It’s not what you eat, but how much of it that causes problems. If you eat three Girl Scout cookies with a glass of milk, you won’t gain weight. If eat a whole box and wash it down with soda, your waistline (and your teeth) will suffer.      

We know a whole box of cookies can total 2000 calories or more; a few cookies are only about 200. You can’t stay fit and healthy if you splurge on cookies and chips regularly. When you feel like snacking in front of the TV, try eating air-popped popcorn seasoned with cayenne pepper or whole-grain crackers. Even if you absentmindedly eat too much, you won’t gain as much weight as if you’d binged on cookies.

Portion control, however, applies to all foods – even the healthy ones. Learn to plan food portions when you cook, and be aware of how much you eat at restaurants.

Drink More Water and Herbal Tea

Drink more water before meals and between meals to fill up your stomach. You’ll eat less and be well-hydrated. Along with herbal tea, water prevents hunger pangs without the harmful effects (and calories) of soda, coffee drinks and energy drinks.

Here are a few low to no-calorie herbal teas to keep you full between meals:

  • Green
  • Oolong
  • Goji
  • Chamomile
  • Ginger

Be careful when choosing herbal teas. Some teas, like green and oolong, contain caffeine and can cause you to become jumpy if you drink too much of it

Share Restaurant Meals with a Friend or Bring Home a “Doggie Bag”

According this article, 92% of American restaurants serve large portions, resulting in meals that often contain more calories than the recommended daily calorie requirement for an entire day.

Share an order with a friend, or eat half of an entrée at the restaurant and save the rest for later. Instead of ordering an entrée, order a salad or an appetizer. You can even order a children’s meal. Unless you have strong willpower, avoid the buffet.

Most servers will be happy to accommodate special requests, such as putting salad dressing or gravy in a cup on the side. (Putting salad dressing and condiments on the side prevents you from slathering too much on your food.)

Don’t be afraid to ask for a doggie bag for leftovers. Boxing or bagging leftovers makes sense. Restaurant meals, even at causal sit-down chains, are somewhat expensive, especially if you bring the whole family.

Use a Smaller Plate

We’ve been taught to eat everything on our plates since we were kids. It’s natural to feel guilty if we’re in a restaurant or at a dinner party and we fail to eat all the food in front of us. Learn to use smaller plates. With a larger plate you’ll apt to fill it up even if you know you shouldn’t.

Don’t Use Electronics While You Eat

Eat slowly instead of gulping down your meal. You’ll actually enjoy the taste and texture of your food, and you’ll eat less.

Instead of eating in front of the computer, use your dinner table. Family dinners have been shown to foster better relationships between spouses, as well as parents and children. A home-cooked meal, even one made by a beginning cook, is better for you than gulping down fast food in your car or at your desk.

Tip – Don’t lie down after eating as it will tamper with digestive process and may cause acid reflux, especially if you’ve eaten

Eat Smaller Meals throughout the Day

Studies differ on the advantages of eating smaller meals throughout the day, but the longer you wait between meals, the likelier you are to eat more when you do finally eat. Your body burns energy every time you eat to digest food. When you eat small meals several times a day, it boosts your metabolism and you burn more calories.

Eat oatmeal with blueberries for breakfast instead of bacon, eggs and pancakes. For extra fiber and nutrition, substitute groats for oatmeal. Groats are the whole, unprocessed form of oats. They take longer to cook, but are much more filling than rolled or steel-cut oats.  Follow your breakfast of oatmeal or groats with an apple mid-morning, and eat a tuna sandwich at lunch time. Instead of a sugary coffee specialty drink in the afternoon, drink a sugar-free banana smoothie.  This eating schedule may seem odd at first, like you’re denying yourself food, but all you’re doing is spreading your food intake throughout the day instead of cramming it into two or three meals.

Need more variety in a small-portion diet? Try this delicious 382- calorie Honey Roasted Carrot, Coriander and Ginger Soup with Crunchy Chickpea Croutons soup for lunch or a late afternoon pick-me-up.  Here’s a list of portion-controlled, low-calorie recipes to prevent overeating caused by super-sized food servings.  

Tip- Your body may take up to 20 minutes before you realize you’re full. Slow down your eating by taking smaller bites and thoroughly chewing your food before swallowing. Make sure your mouth is empty before taking another bite of food.  

Get between Seven and Nine Hours of Sleep Each Night

When you’re tired, you tend to crave more carbohydrates and overeat. (Fatigue’s been shown to stimulate production of Ghrelin, a hunger-inducing hormone.) After you eat cake, doughnuts or other processed carbs, you’ll feel energetic for awhile, but it’ll soon fade. Getting enough sleep provides you with more natural focus and energy to get through your day and perform tasks, and it curbs your appetite too.

Choose Whole, Unprocessed Foods

When you replace processed foods with fresh foods, and eat smaller meals several times each day, you’ll lose weight or, at the very least, maintain your current weight. And you’ll feel “lighter” and healthier instead of feeling “stuffed” after each meal.

Eat a salad, low-fat chicken soup or veggies as an appetizer. The fiber helps control your appetite and fills you up fast. Veggies, salad and other fiber-heavy foods travel more slowly through your digestive system. Broccoli, spinach and tomatoes are just a few vegetables that’ll fill you up and add valuable nutrients to your diet. Broccoli is high in Vitamin K, Vitamin C, iron and potassium. It also contains many plant compounds that contribute to better health, including sulforaphane, which protects against many different types of cancer.    

study in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that eating potato chips or French fries regularly leads to a bigger weight gain than noshing on other comfort foods.

If you can’t summon the willpower to stop eating chips and cookies,  then keep your house free of sugary and salty treats until you can exercise self control. Replace high-calorie snacks with fresh fruits.

Diets high in red meat, alcohol, sugary drinks and processed flour also lead to an arthritic condition called gout. Avoid gout by eating more eggs, whole grains, Vitamin C, low-fat dairy products and drinking more water. Also avoid certain food combinations when planning meals. Eating bacon and eggs, or any two concentrated protein sourcesin a single meal will impede digestion and cause fatigue.

Measure Your Food When Cooking at Home

At home, don’t guesstimate how much salt, flour or butter you’ll need for a recipe – at least until you until become skilled at it. Buy an accurate scale, measuring cups and measuring spoons if you don’t have them already.

When you cook at home, include protein (beans, lean red meat, etc.) and low glycemic index carbohydrates (whole grains, pasta) with every meal. When figuring portions, a half cup of oatmeal or pasta is referred to as a single serving.  Two cups of raw spinach equals one serving; half a cup is the best serving size for cooked or canned veggies.

Serve food from the stove or a separate serving station. If you eat from serving platters at the table, it’ll be easier to lose track of how often you help yourself to more food. You’ll be more aware of going for your third or fourth helping if you have to get up and walk to the stove or counter to get food.

It may seem a little old-fashioned to schedule meals at exact times, but it does help you focus only on eating and prevent you from multi-tasking when you should be enjoying your food. You shouldn’t do anything but eat while you’re at the table – unless, of course you have an interesting tablemate. Talking with a friend or family member may actually make you eat less, while other distractions make you eat more.

You’ll be better able to keep track of how much you eat when you schedule regular meals. When meals are scheduled and just a few hours apart, you’ll be better able to control cravings for junk food and quick trips to the Starbucks.

Distract Yourself When You’re Tempted to Overeat

Although drinking coffee at Starbucks costs more than brewing it at home, many people buy their lattes from coffee shops because of the social outlet it gives them. You don’t need to give up the social aspect of going to Starbucks or another local coffee shop – just order plain coffee instead of sugary coffee drinks with whipped cream on top.

If you eat when you’re bored or upset, try doing something else to pass the time and forgot about food. Take a walk, visit a friend or do yoga. You’ll soon be immersed in your new activity and lose the desire to snack.

Eat a cup of low-calorie vegetables before a meal as an appetizer, or add vegetables to casseroles and sandwiches. Adding a low-calorie vegetable to a meal supplies nutrients, and its high water content fills you up to prevent overeating.  

Portions and Digestive Health

Your digestive system consists of your mouth, esophagus, stomach, intestines, liver pancreas and rectum. That’s a lot of body parts for a seven-course meal to work its way through three times a day, everyday. Large meals of processed foods keep you “backed up”.   If you eat three heavy meals daily, your body has to work extra hard to process all that food. It’s much better to eat smaller, more frequent meals. If you must eat larger meals, choose lighter foods – fish, organically-raised poultry, vegetables and whole grains – instead of the usual meat and potatoes.  

The most common digestive problems related to overeating and bad food combinations include upset stomach, nausea, bloating, acid reflux and constipation.

Watching your food portions during meals – and when you’re snacking – helps you stay fit and energetic. It may take awhile to get used to eating smaller portions and saving the rest for later, but once you find out how much better you feel when you eat light, you won’t go back to “stuffing” yourself at dinner.

For extra energy in between meals, take a REVV Instant Energy WaferRevv is made with the superfood wheatgrass, along with periwinkle herb, choline, L-taurine and tasty, healthy cocoa. REVV’s a safe, natural supplement that gives you vigor without the sugar and calories of energy drinks. 

10 Health Benefits of Seaweed

Most Americans only consume seaweed when they visit a Japanese restaurant.

You’ve probably had seaweed in salad, miso soup or in the wrapping around a sushi roll. But seaweed is more than a decoration on your sushi plate.

According to a study published on Biomed Central, all varieties of seaweed offer nutrients and distinct flavoring for many cuisines. Umami, a Japanese term for “fifth taste”, is becoming popular among Western chefs looking for different ways to add flavors to their dishes..

Sometimes referred to as sea or marine vegetables, seaweed adds taste and texture to salads, burgers and other everyday dishes.  It also offers many nutritional advantages in a relatively small package. You don’t need to eat a lot of seaweed to experience the following benefits.

1. Lowers Blood Pressure

Seaweed contains bioactive peptides, which have some of the same properties as Accupril, Vasotec, Monopril and other ACE inhibitor drugs. Eat more seaweed, along with other vegetables, to naturally reduce your chance of strokes and heart attacks.

2. Reduces Toxins in Your Body

Aliginic acid, a substance in seaweed, binds with the toxins in your body to speed their  elimination. When you eat seaweed, it sops up lead, cadmium and other environmental pollutants that end up in your body from cigarette smoking and air pollution. 

3. Contains Minerals and B Vitamins

Seaweed contains chlorophyll, the same green pigment that gives your houseplants their color. Chlorophyll has hundreds of amino acids, enzymes, vitamins and minerals. A little bit of chlorophyll goes a long way towards improving your energy and overall health.

For example, a tablespoon of the seaweed dulse provides 500% of the daily value of iodine, 16% of Vitamin C and manganese, 11% of Vitamin B2, and small amounts of zinc, protein, iron, potassium and Vitamins B3, B6, B1 and B5.

Wakame is an excellent source of Vitamin A, magnesium, manganese, iron, niacin, folate, calcium, Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Vitamin E.

4. Offers a High Iodine Content for Better Thyroid Health

Seaweed contains iodine, a nutrient important for maintaining thyroid health. Your thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, produces and regulates hormones. Women have larger thyroids than men, and when they’re under stress, their thyroids become larger and you need more iodine. One in four women are thought to have an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism, causes weight gain, mood swings and lethargy) or an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism, causes excessive hunger, fatigue, irregular heartbeat and insomnia). Adding more seaweed to the diet is one way to control these conditions.

The amount of iodine in the average U.S. diet has decreased from 500-800 mcg in 1940 to 136 mcg in 1995. Serious iodine deficiency is rare in the U.S., as most fruits and vegetables are grown in iodine-rich soil, and prepared foods contain iodized salt. Your body requires 100-200 mcg of iodine per day, and kelp and most brown seaweed have between 500 and 1500 parts per million (ppm) of iodine.

Other foods with iodine include most fish (canned tuna and sardines, cod, shrimp, salmon, sea bass and halibut, etc.), and many veggies, including Swiss chard, spinach and lima beans.

5. Provides Anti-Cancer and Anti-Inflammatory Benefits

Sea vegetables offer lots of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds to reduce the risk of cancer. Research on colon cancer indicates that seaweed extracts may alter the loss of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) on colon cancer cells, improving recovery for people suffering from the disease. The low rate of breast cancer in Japan is often attributed to the consumption of seaweed as part of the daily diet.

Fucoidans, polysaccharides in bladderwrack and other brown seaweed, have been shown to decrease cell proliferation in certain types of cancer.

Kelp inhibits the bacteria Helicobacter pylori, which causes inflammatory skin conditions and stomach ulcers. The high antioxidant content of the edible green seaweedsUlva clathrata and Ulva prolifera has been shown to reduce inflammation that causes arthritis, asthma and celiac disease.

6. Seaweed Offers Benefits for Reproductive and Sexual Health

All classes of seaweed contribute to sexual health due to their high manganese and Vitamin B2 content. Seaweed helps regulate estrogen and other hormones, and it may be a good addition to meals for women going through menopause. Eating seaweed also provides relief for Women who suffer from bad PMS symptoms.

Research conducted at the University of California, Berkeley suggests eating bladderwrack and other brown kelp seaweed may lengthen the menstrual cycle and delay the onset of menopause. It may also relieve symptoms of endometriosis and improve fertility.

Men’s sperm count also benefits from eating seaweed. It’s rich in Vitamin E, which fights free radicals in the sperm membrane.

7. Improves Dental Health

Seaweed contains extracts that help prevent cavities and gingivitis. It improves salivary function and strengthens oral tissue to resist damage. Dental alginate, which is used to make molds of patients’ teeth, is derived from the alginic acid in seaweed.

8. Smoother, Younger Looking Skin

The vitamins, minerals and antioxidants in seaweed have anti-aging properties that guard against dry skin and wrinkles. Seaweed extract may be of value as a topical ointment for aging skin.  Seaweed wraps and baths, used in many spas, detoxify the skin. The phytonutrients in seaweed improve blood flow to restore skin’s youthful luster.

Adding seaweed to meals increases the amount of Vitamin A and Vitamin C in your diet. Vitamin A helps repair skin tissue, and Vitamin C boosts collagen production and improves the texture of your skin.

9. Boosts Energy

People in the Caribbean and Ireland have depended on seaweed-based soups as energy tonics for centuries, and this method can work for you, too. Whether you’re feeling tired after a busy week or recovering from an acute illness, a soup filled with greens, sprouts, avocado and seaweed will revitalize you. Seaweed soup is sometimes used as a hangover cure, and may dissolve the phlegm associated with colds, respiratory ailments and the flu.

Arame and other brown seaweeds help balance your body’s pH, to maintain a healthy acid/alkaline ratio. It improves gut flora to benefit digestion, control weight and even guard against depression. In the book,  Beating Stress, Anxiety and Depression: Groundbreaking Ways to Help You Feel Better, author Jane A. Plant, recommends eating seaweed, along with more Omega 3 fatty acids and fewer dairy products, to naturally relieve depression.

10. Strengthens Hair

A study conducted on rats showed extracts from the seaweed Grateloupia elliptica prevented hair lossResearch indicated treating the scalp with seaweed extract and eating more seaweed, may be beneficial for preventing hair loss in humans. Using shampoos formulated with seaweed extract protects hair against environmental damage and makes it shinier and stronger.

Types of Seaweed

Seaweed (aka algae) has been part of the diet in Japan and other Asian countries for centuries. Many studies have noted how seaweed, along with soy and other staples of the Japanese diet, play a part in that country’s lower cancer and obesity rates.

There are over 20 different types of seaweed, divided into three classes by color – brown, red and green.  

A few of the most popular seaweed varieties include:

  • Wakame

This sweet, dark green seaweed adds flavor to sandwiches and miso soup. Packed with folate, potassium, beta-carotene, calcium and magnesium, it adds plenty of nutrients to your diet in a small package. Like other seaweed, it offers carotenoids, flavonoids and other cell-protecting antioxidants. Wakame’s high in sodium, with 70% of your daily value per 100 grams, so don’t eat too much of it at a sitting, especially if you have high blood pressure.

  • Arame

Mildly sweet arame consists of long brown strands used as an edible garnish in Japanese food. You might find it in soups and salads, or to the side of your sushi or sashimi in your Bento box. Arame contains all the nutrients of other seaweed, including potassium, Vitamin A, Vitamin C and magnesium, but, like all seaweed, it’s high in sodium.

  • Dulse 

Usually sold in flakes, this red seaweed is great as a seasoning in soups, salads and as a complement to other vegetables. Dulse can be dried, ground, chopped or fried.  It tastes faintly like bacon when fried and is sometimes added to meat entrees.  Nutrient-wise, Dulse contains magnesium, calcium and iron to keep bones strong. It has a high iodine content, like other seaweed to ensure your thyroid works properly, and potassium to lower blood pressure.

  • Kombu

More commonly known as kelp, kombu is used in noodle broth, or dashi, to enhance flavor. It can be eaten dried, fresh, or pickled in vinegar.

It contains an anticoagulant phytochemical called fucoidan, which helps stop clots from forming in blood vessels. A study in the April 2011 edition of Phytotherapy Research showed the most popular type of kombu, Laminaria japonica, has a polysaccharide fraction called PLG. PLG can delay blood clotting without extending bleeding time. It’s also been shown to decrease bad cholesterol and increase good cholesterol in rats.

  • Nori

Red seaweed sheets used to wrap sushi, nori has as much protein density as spirulina and soybeans. It’s one-third dietary fiber, making it a natural laxative. Its high-fiber content also makes you feel full, suppressing your appetite Nori is high in iron, but it lacks the phytates common in grains and other high-iron foods. Lack of phytates improves iron absorption, according to a study in the Journal of Nutrition.

Instead of simply eating seaweed or non-GMO soy separately for their health benefits, make your own miso soup. Traditional miso soup usually contains seaweed and soy, which gives it double the anti-aging power. This recipe contains both wakame and soy.   

Seaweed counts as part of our daily vegetable intake (2 ½ cups per day for women 31-50, 3 cups for men 31-50). Here are a few more ideas for incorporating seaweed into your diet.

  • Add arame or the seaweed of your choice to any pasta salad, cooked whole grains or stir-fried vegetables to liven up flavor and texture.
  • Prepare a healthy shrimp burger with fresh herbs and wakame slaw instead of regular slaw.
  • This quick 10-minute Seaweed Salad combines wakame, garlic, sesame seeds, shredded carrots and other healthy ingredients for a tasty alternative to bland “house” salads.

Consuming Seaweed Safely

Eating too much seaweed isn’t considered acutely toxic or lethal, but it can cause several medical problems. Although seaweed is touted for its healthy properties, it does contain large amounts of iodine. If you eat too much seaweed, you may develop goiter, and it may cause toxicity in people with thyroid disorders.

Kombu (kelp) from the genera Laminaria has high amounts of iodine (2353 μg/g ), Wakame contains moderate iodine amounts of  42 μg/g, and Nori contains 6 μg/g.

Boil Kombu and other seaweed in water for 15-30 minutes to reduce the amount of iodine. Boling will significantly reduce the iodine in kelp, and leech moderate amounts of iodine from Wakame and Nori. Processed and cooked seaweed is much safer to eat in large quantities than raw seaweed.

Bok choy, broccoli and soybeans, ingredients used in some Japanese dishes along with kelp, are goitrogens. Goitrogens, foods with anti-thyroid properties, counteract the effects of too much iodine consumption.

Seaweed isn’t the only highly nutritious superfood that contains chlorophyll. Wheatgrass offers 20 amino acids, hundreds of enzymes, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals, even more than seaweed. You can’t eat wheatgrass like your cat, but REVV Instant Energy Wafers offer a great pick-me-up whenever and wherever you need it. REVV sugar and chemical-free wafers also contain cocoa, choline, L-Taurine and Periwinkle herb for and overall energy boost.  

 

Meditation for Anxiety

Meditation has grown from a counterculture phenomenon in the 1960s to a scientifically-studied alternative health aid in 2015. People in all walks of life practice meditation today to handle life’s stresses better and prevent anxiety-driven diseases. Meditation for anxiety is one of the best ways to control your reaction to stress before it spirals out of control.

Types of Meditation for Anxiety and Overall Well-Being

There are a few types of meditation. Transcendental meditation (TM for short), was popularized by the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi (and his most famous followers, the Beatles, in the 1960s. In this type of meditation, the practitioner focuses on his or her breathing and uses a mantra or Sanskrit phrase to further assist in the mind-clearing process. TM is performed in a seated position.

Mindfulness meditation was introduced in 1979 and has become a widely-used stress reduction method. It’s used in hospitals and medical centers to treat anxiety, and many health professionals recommend it to help people coping with physical or mental illnesses. You focus on your breath, concentrating on inhalation and exhalation while seated or lying down. This is the best meditation for reducing anxiety.

Zen meditation, a seated Buddhist meditation, was popularized in modern culture by the Dalai Lama.  You observe your breath and your thoughts through meditation and study Sutras (scriptures) with the help of a teacher. Some Zen Buddhist meditation includes chants.

Mindfulness Meditation Helps You Stay in the Here and Now

When you have chronic anxiety, even the slightest incident in your life may lead to a string of worrisome thoughts about what might happen in the future. Instead of focusing on what could go right or calmly thinking of solutions for potential problems, you feel tense and powerless. When these negative thoughts continue on a daily basis, they rob you of happiness and prevent you from living in the moment. Having these thoughts for weeks, months or years robs you of productive thoughts and actions. This results in stagnation or fear-based decisions. Constant- or even occasional- anxiety prevents you from living up to your potential.

Mindfulness meditation is a natural way to train your mind to banish unproductive thoughts and remain calm. It helps you experience your thoughts in a non-judgmental manner, and let them pass by until your mind achieves clarity. Mindfulness meditation won’t eliminate the tendency to worry or overthink after your first attempt, but you’ll feel more peaceful. Over time, it will teach you to be more focused and peaceful.

Studies Show Mindfulness Meditation for Anxiety Works

An article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine in 2014 suggested that mindfulness meditation can help reduce anxiety and depression. The researchers compared results of 47 professionally-designed studies on meditation to come to this conclusion. One of the studies showed that people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) who practiced mindfulness meditation as part of a stress reduction program fared better than patients who used other methods. Although both groups improved, the group that practiced mindfulness showed better results.

Use Meditation for Anxiety with a Healthy Diet and Exercise to Control Stress

Relieving anxiety naturally involves several lifestyle changes. Mindfulness meditation is a good start, but you’ll also need to change your diet. Eat more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and fish and stop eating processed and fatty foods. Drink water and herbal tea instead of soft drinks. Stop smoking and drinking alcohol to excess. A glass of wine with dinner may be healthy for you, but sitting in front of the TV drinking beer isn’t.

We know exercise is essential for physical health and disease prevention, but it can also ease anxiety. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (AADA), many studies show physical activity sharpens cognitive function, increases alertness and boosts energy. When you’re worried, stress affects both your brain and body. Anxiety causes fatigue, and exercise counteracts that by producing endorphins, your body’s natural feel-good chemical. Endorphins are natural painkillers, and they help you fall asleep faster at night – and sleep more restfully. Better sleep helps reduce stress. We’ve all experienced an occasional sleepless night, tossing and turning as we run over some problem in our minds. Insomnia causes even more anxiety (and physical problems, like high blood pressure), in addition to fatigue. Physical activity tires you out so you won’t  be as apt to worry yourself into sleeplessness at night.

How Meditation for Anxiety Changes Your Brain

A 2013 study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center involved 15 participants with everyday anxiety. These individuals received four classes in mindfulness meditation. Researchers studied participants’ brains with special imaging equipment before and after meditation training. The brain imaging revealed that meditation-induced stress relief activates the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex controls thinking and emotions, and when activity increases in this part of the brain, anxiety fades.

Some Tips for better Mindfulness Meditation: Preparation

1. Find a quiet place where you can sit comfortably without distraction. (No TV, no cell phone, computer, or kids barging in with their problem du jour). This won’t be hard to do even for people with hectic lives, since 5-15 minutes per meditation session is all that’s needed to achieve results. (You can meditate for a half-hour or even longer once you became accustomed to the process).

2. Do a few stretching exercises before sitting or lying down to meditate. It will help you relax, a hard proposition for active, Type A personalities.

3. Sit or lie down, whatever is most comfortable for you. You don’t need to sit cross-legged on the floor (the most common meditation position for experienced practitioners), unless that feels right for you. Sit or lie with your spine straight.

Meditation for Anxiety: How to Make the Most of It

4. Sit still and allow your mind to wander. Stay in the present moment. Don’t think about what you have to do tomorrow or next week. You can meditate in silence or play relaxing music in the background. There are CDs made specifically for meditation, although some classical or New Age music works just as well.

5. You can meditate with your eyes open or closed. Concentrate on your breathing to keep yourself calm. Take deep breaths. Inhale from your nose and exhale from your mouth, or do a few complete breaths. During a complete breath, your inhale from your nose filling your stomach up like it’s a balloon. Then exhale slowly, letting your stomach deflate. Only do a few Complete Breaths initially; if you try to do too many of them too soon or too quickly, it may make you dizzy. Most people practice shallow chest breathing and take in a minimum amount of air in their lungs. When you first breathe slowly and deeply, it may be a shock to your system (in a good way).

6. You may remain silent while practicing meditation for anxiety (mindfulness meditation) or repeat a mantra (TM or Zen meditation). A mantra is a “sentence or group of sounds with a phonetic significance.” The repetition of a mantra helps calm the mind, steady the breathing and clear the mind of extraneous thoughts. Om or Aum, used in the Hindu tradition, is the most popular mantra. You may also repeat this meditation from Thich Nhat Hahn, a spiritual leader and Vietnamese Buddhist monk “Breathing in, I calm my body. Breathing out, I smile. Dwelling in the present moment, I know this is a wonderful moment.”

7. Your mind may wander every few seconds during your initial attempts at meditation for anxiety and that’s okay. Just let the thoughts come and go. Focus on your breathing again to bring yourself back into the present. The purpose of meditation is to keep your attention focused on the now, not the future or the memories of your past.

8. If you find yourself getting sleepy, try a different position, (sitting instead of lying down). When you are ready to finish, open your eyes and stand up. You don’t need to officially time yourself or use an alarm, just finish when you’re ready.

The Superfood Wheatgrass along with Meditation for Anxiety Can Improve Your Health

Diet, exercise and meditation help reduce stress and let you live a more fulfilling, self-aware life. Taking a nutrient-packed supplement gives you even more protection against stress-related health issues. High-grade wheatgrass, one of nature’s most nutritious superfoods, provides more vitamins, minerals and nutrients than any multivitamin.

Grown from wheat  seeds, the sprouts are used to make 100% natural, chlorophyll- rich wheatgrass supplements. Wheatgrass has hundreds of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and enzymes to keep you healthy, vibrant and soothe your nerves during hectic times. Chlorophyll, the main nutrient in wheatgrass, contains an abundance of magnesium. According to this 2006 study. Magnesium helps reduce depression and related conditions, which include anxiety and irritability. Another study indicated that magnesium deficiency may cause stress-related physical disorders. A recent government study indicates 68% of Americans don’t get enough magnesium.  This may be a partial explanation for why so many people are stressed out all the time. The high magnesium content in wheatgrass helps people handle mild to moderate, non-clinical stress. Magnesium also promotes heart and bone health and helps reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Wheatgrass is loaded with B-complex vitamins, including calming Vitamin B9 (folic acid) and B12, mood enhancers which help relieve depression. Since depression and anxiety are connected, B-complex vitamins can help reduce the emotional and physical effects of stress. Vitamin B12 and folic acid help guard against heart palpitations and keep blood pressure steady in people who suffer from stress-related panic attacks. Some wheatgrass supplements add additional B-complex vitamins to the B vitamins already in this superfood.

Beat Anxiety and Feel Healthier and More Energetic with Wheatgrass Supplements from WheatgrassLove!

Wheatgrass supplement tablets from WheatgrassLove provide magnesium and B-vitamins to reduce the effects of stress and depression, but they have dozens of other health benefits. Here are just a few:

Breaks down fats and proteins to improve immune system function

Neutralizes and detoxifies poisons in your body

Breaks down carbohydrates into glucose to boost your energy

Neutralizes and detoxifies poisons in your body

Prevents your body from absorbing more toxins

Improves digestion and keeps you regular

Increases blood and oxygen flow, which helps sharpen focus and mental function

Zeal O2, HappyGirl and REVV from WheatgrassLove Offer Nutrients to Help the Effects of Meditation for Anxiety

HappyGirl Natural Mood Enhancing Supplement uses the power of wheatgrass, with anti-anxiety B12 and B9 (folic acid) and magnesium, to relieve stress and keep you calm and focused. The other nutrients in wheatgrass keep you energized while neutralizing mood swings.HappyGirl can be used to treat anxiety from PMS, menopause and everyday stress. HappyGirl also boasts an herbal blend of green tea extract, cayenne pepper, white willow, gotu kola, ginseng, ginger and other herbs to keep you calm during the most hectic times. Men and seniors can use HappyGirl, too! Read more about HappyGirlhere: http://wheatgrasslove.com/products/mood-enhancement-supplement

Lose weight and control stress with Zeal O2 Natural Weight Loss Supplement and Energy Booster. This high-value wheatgrass supplement from Wheatgrass Love offers the full spectrum of wheatgrass nutrients. Vitamins A, E, K, C and B-complex, calcium, zinc, potassium, selenium, and, of course, magnesium make up the vitamin and mineral core of this super-supplement. Wheatgrass contains amino acids, digestive enzymes and phytochemicals to keep you healthy and focused while you lose weight. We’ve included  a proprietary blend of herbs in Zeal O2 for more fat-burning and anti-anxiety power. Cayenne pepper, gingko biloba, ginseng, green tea extract and other herbs keep you calm and focused while Citrus Aurantium (bitter orange) helps your body burn fat without raising your blood pressure or heart rate. Read more about Zeal O2 here: http://wheatgrasslove.com/products/natural-weight-loss-supplement   

REVV Natural Energy Supplement fights fatigue with a 100% natural, high grade wheatgrass with added B-complex vitamins. These delicious chocolate mint wafers also contains L-taurine, to stabilize your cholesterol level and support neurotransmitters in the brain. Periwinkle herb increases the flow of blood to the brain, improving memory and protecting against Alzheimer’s and dementia. Read more about REVVhere: http://wheatgrasslove.com/products/natural-energy-supplement

Call us today at 877-303-1717 to order your Zeal O2, HappyGirl or REVV! We’ll be happy to answer any questions you may have about our products or wheatgrass in general!

What are the Benefits of B Complex Vitamins?

This article will give you an overview of all eight B-complex vitamins and the ways they contribute to mental and physical well-being.

B complex vitamins are a group of water soluble vitamins. Each vitamin in this group has a particular function in the human body, but all B vitamins share some similarities.

They are necessary to turn the food we eat into energy. Better cognitive function, anti-stress properties, protection against cancer and heart disease and a happier mood are just a few benefits of B complex vitamins.

There are eight B complex vitamins:

B1 (thiamin), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid), Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine ), Vitamin B7(biotin), Vitamin B9 (folate or folic acid), and Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin).

All B complex vitamins are water soluble. This means they’re not stored in the body – you need to get the required daily amount of each vitamin from food and/or supplements.

Most people get enough of the benefits of B-complex vitamins from the food they eat.

What are the benefits of B complex vitaminsAnd how can they increase your lifespan and help you avoid many unpleasant health problems?

One or more B complex vitamins are found in most foods. Each B complex vitamin has slightly different functions and benefits. B complex vitamins are also present in wheatgrass supplements, including wheatgrass tablets and wheatgrass juice. Wheatgrass supplemented with extra B complex vitamins is one of the best high-value sources of these essential nutrients.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) – An Anti-Stress Vitamin That Helps the Immune System

Vitamin B1 or thiamin, is a water-soluble anti-stress vitamin. Like other Vitamins, it toughens the immune system. Along with Vitamins B6 and B12, it helps to balance your mood and reduce the ill effects of stressful situations. The benefits of B complex vitamins extend to more than physical health; they aid mental function and are helpful in treating mild to moderate depression in some people. Many health practitioners are now considering natural treatments for depression instead of prescription antidepressants, and B-vitamins are often recommended.

Thiamin plays a crucial role in metabolic processes. It helps make adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a substance needed by every cell in the body to produce energy. Most people get enough Vitamin B1 from their diet. Anorexics, alcoholics and people with Crohn’s disease may suffer from a deficient in Vitamin B1.

Retaining good eyesight into old age is one of the health benefits of B-complex vitamins.

Individuals who get enough vitamin B1, B2, niacin and Vitamin A are unlikely to develop cataracts. Add Vitamin C, E and all B-complex vitamins to your diet to further protect against cataracts. Thiamin may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, though no conclusive studies have been recorded.

Water pills or diuretics taken by people with heart failure may sap the body of Vitamin B1. These pills get rid of excess fluid, but may also get rid of too much thiamin. Taking a multivitamin or wheatgrass supplement with B1 and other B-complex vitamins can prevent this from occurring.

Vitamin B1 is found in sunflower seeds, lentils, fortified cereals, oats and barley, but beans and beans are the greatest source of thiamin. This includes navy beans, pinto beans, black beans, lima beans and green peas.

Antioxidant-Rich Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) Aids Growth and Thyroid Function

Vitamin B2 promotes energy production, and provides many of the basic health benefits of B complex vitamins. It is needed to recycle the important antioxidant glutathione and support red blood cell production.

Riboflavin has some of the best benefits of B complex vitamins, as it helps regulate thyroid activity and aids in protein formation necessary for growth of the body. It promotes immunity because it fights infections and toughens antibodies. Like Vitamin C, it aids the body in absorbing other minerals, and assists in wound healing and tissue repair. 1

Teenagers and others who suffer from acne will experience clearer skin as one of the benefits of B complex vitamins. Vitamin B2 is excellent for promoting mucus secretion to remove acne pustules.

You can get Vitamin B2 from fortified breakfast cereal and bread, almonds, soybeans, spinach, milk, eggs, yogurt and turkey.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin) Fights High Cholesterol and Heart Disease

Niacin (Vitamin B3) aids the nervous, cardiovascular and digestive systems and high-grade versions are sometimes prescribed for patients with high blood pressure, high cholesterol or signs of heart disease. Individuals with high cholesterol.

A study showed that men with heart disease who took niacin and colestipol prevented atherosclerosis from progressing. The combination also cut down on heart attacks and deaths from heart disease. Niacin and the prescription drug Zocor, when taken together, lowered study participants’ risk of having a first heart attack or stroke.

Niacinamide,(a form of niacin) may buy you time before you need to use insulin for Type 1 diabetes. Some studies indicate niacinamide may protect children against developing Type 1 diabetes. Niacin may lower fats and cholesterol in patients with Type 2 diabetes, but it may raise blood sugar. Elevated blood sugar may be dangerous for diabetics, so people with Type 2 diabetes should only take niacin if their doctor recommends it. 

Tuna, chicken, peanuts, turkey, lamb and beef contain high amounts of niacin. You can get most of your daily requirement of Vitamin B3 from protein-rich foods. This nutrient is involved in energy production, like other B complex vitamins. Beside energy metabolism, the enzymes in niacin provide antioxidants to keep tissues healthy. Niacin improves the appetite, keeps skin clear, and promotes nervous system function.

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) Keeps You Looking Younger and Increases Stamina

Vitamin B5 turns food into fuel like other B vitamins. This water-soluble vitamin helps produce red blood cells. It helps produce stress and sex hormones in the adrenal glands and helps the body use Vitamin B2, and to a lesser extent, other vitamins. Vitamin B5 synthesizes many substances needed by your body. It helps form proteins, fats, amino acids and carbohydrates.

This B vitamin may improve a number of health conditions. Pantethine, a derivative of pantothenic acid, may lower fats and triglycerides in patients with high cholesterol, according to some studies. It increases stamina, raising metabolic processes to a productive level, and may be helpful for athletes. Along with Vitamin B7 (biotin), Vitamin B5 keeps skin and hair young-looking. It delays the appearance of age spots and wrinkles and keeps the complexion smooth. A sufficient amount of B5 in the diet shields your hair’s’ pigmentation, preventing it from turning gray prematurely.

Pantothenic Acid is available in mushrooms, oily fish, avocados, eggs, beef, chicken, turkey, sweet potatoes and lean pork, among other foods. You can take this B-complex vitamin in wheatgrass supplements or other nutritional tablets. Wheatgrass contains some B-complex vitamins naturally, and some wheatgrass tablets have an additional B-complex blend to give you more health benefits.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) Regulates Blood Sugar and Boosts Mood

Vitamin B6 is found in bananas, fortified cereal, avocados and chicken breast, among other foods. It helps the nervous system stay healthy, regulates blood sugar and breaks down proteins. This vitamin, also called pyridoxine, helps hemoglobin transport oxygen to cells. Like magnesium, it helps ease muscle cramps, and it is used to relieve symptoms of asthma and arthritis.

The brain benefits of B complex vitamins, especially Vitamins B6 and B12, are increased mental function, memory and a better mood. Vitamin B6 aids in the creation of the mood-boosting chemical serotonin. Many prescription antidepressants, including Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), work by increasing the level of serotonin in a person’s brain, but they may have harmful side effects. Taking a Vitamin B6 supplement may help reduce depression naturally in some people.

The health benefits of B-complex vitamins include protection against heart disease. Taking a B-complex supplement that includes Vitamin B6, B12 and folic acid may guard against a high level of homocysteine, which can cause cardiovascular disease.

Vitamin B7 (Biotin) for Better Hair, Nails and Skin

Biotin (Vitamin B7) is needed by every cell in your body, and deficiencies in this vitamin are rare. Sometimes called Vitamin H, biotin is involved in hormone production. Vitamin B7, like other B-complex vitamins, is necessary for the body’s metabolic processes. It helps in the breakdown of foods during the digestive process, and is sometimes called the “beauty vitamin”, for its contribution to healthy skin, hair and nails. If you’re interested in adding something new to your beauty routine, eating foods rich in Vitamin B7 have the strongest skin health benefits of B complex vitamins.

Biotin also regulates blood sugar, which is helpful in controlling diabetes. According to a study conducted in Spain, adding biotin-rich mixed nuts into the diet for three months improved blood sugar for participants running a risk of diabetes. Sweet potatoes, peanuts, almonds, carrots, onions, eggs and salmon are good sources of Vitamin B7.

Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid or Folate) Prevents Birth Defects and Improves Heart Health

Vitamin B9 (folic acid or folate) helps structure DNA and aids in making cells. Folate is the naturally-occurring version of Vitamin B9 in foods; folic acid is the synthetic version found in supplements. Broccoli, okra, lettuce, melon, lemons, orange juice and most meats contain folate. Folic acid is added to cereals, crackers, pasta and bakery items per a 1998 federal law.

Alcoholism, inflammatory bowel disease and some medications may cause folic acid deficiency. Symptoms of Vitamin B9 deficiency include loss of appetite, poor mental function, gingivitis and shortness of breath.

Protection against birth defects is one of the best-known benefits of B complex vitamins, specifically Vitamin B9. Folic acid is important for pregnant women because it prevents birth defects caused by impaired development of the neural tubes. Pregnant women need 600 mcg of folic acid a day, and women trying to become pregnant need 400 mcg per day.

Vitamin B9 has all the cardiovascular benefits of B complex vitamins. Clinical trials show that folic acid may reduce the chance of heart disease. It may help lower the amount of the amino acid homocysteine in the body. Research indicates people with high levels of homocysteine are more likely to have a stroke or coronary artery disease than people with normal levels of this amino acid.

Other benefits of Vitamin B9 are delay or prevention of age-related eyesight and hearing problems. A study on macular degeneration in women found that participants who took 2,500 mcg of Vitamin B9, along with increased intake of Vitamin B12 and Vitamin B6, had a lower risk of getting a vision-impairing eye disease called AMD. Studies conducted on folic acid and its effect on depression indicate that people with low levels of Vitamin B9 suffer from depression. Taking Vitamin B9 may help women who suffer from depression better than the antidepressant Prozac, but may not help men with depression.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

Vitamin B12 works with Vitamin B9 to make hemoglobin. It is found in beef, sardines, cod, tuna, yogurt, milk, cheese, turkey, scallops and other animal-derived foods. Vegans and vegetarians can consume B12 in fortified foods and supplements such as wheatgrass tablets with added B complex vitamins.3

Vitamin B12 is used to treat pernicious anemia, which causes extreme weakness and may lead to other health problems. It strengthens muscles, boosts mood and increases overall energy and vitality. A proper amount of Vitamin B12 in your system guards against Multiple Sclerosis, depression and Alzheimer’s disease. Like other B complex vitamins, it helps reduce the inflammation that can cause cancer and helps keep the cardiovascular system functioning properly, protecting against heart disease.

Get all the Benefits of B Complex Vitamins and Hundreds of Other Nutrients in Zeal O2, REVV and Happy Girl

While many foods contain one or more B complex vitamins, the superfood wheatgrass contains all B complex vitamins – and WheatgrassLove’s wheatgrass supplement tablets have added B complex vitamins for even more nutritional support.

Zeal O2 is a weight loss supplement that doubles as a vitamin and mineral powerhouse to keep you strong and focused while you diet. It has a blend of lab tested herbs including citrus aurantium (bitter orange) for better appetite control; green tea extract for improved mental alertness and protection against inflammation and disease, and over a dozen other herbs to keep you fit, trim and healthy before and after your diet. Read more about Zeal O2.

REVV Natural Energy Supplement combines the power of wheatgrass and the benefits of B complex vitamins to improve clarity and brain function and “rev” you up when you feel blah. It includes L-taurine, a building block for amino acids, and periwinkle herb, to increase blood flow to the brain. These tasty chocolate mint wafers are great for an energy anytime of the day or night. Read more about REVV

Happy Girl Mood Enhancer helps men and women control their mood better through wheatgrass (with all the benefits of B complex vitamins) and a proprietary blend of cayenne pepper, fo-ti, ginseng, green tea extract and other calming, nutrient-filled herbs. The chlorophyll in wheatgrass safely balances your body’s pH to help prevent mood swings and alleviate mild depression. Happy Girl’s  proprietary blend offers extra health benefits to improve circulation, digestion and endurance. Read more about Happy Girl Mood Enhancer.

All Wheatgrass Love products are guaranteed to work to your satisfaction or your money back! Call us at 877-303-1717 to learn more or place your first order! Always consult your medical provider before using any dietary supplement.